MEDIA RELEASE - WORK BEGINS ON NEW ROUSE ROAD BRIDGE - 23 NOVEMBER 2017

Residents who use Rouse Road in Rouse Hill will notice fences going up and machinery on the ground around Second Ponds Creek, as works have now begun for the new Rouse Road Bridge project.

The current Rouse Road crossing regularly floods during periods of rain and long closures of the road cause problems for local residents, teachers, parents and students from the nearby Rouse Hill Anglican College. 

The project to create a new bridge over Second Ponds Creek is being jointly funded by the Federal Government and Blacktown City Council. The works are projected to cost around $7 million to complete and will include construction of a new bridge, roundabout and approach roads between Terry Road and Worcester Road. 

The existing Rouse Road crossing will operate as normal throughout the duration of the project. The new bridge is due to be completed by December 2018.  

“This project is a victory for the local community, who have been calling for this necessary upgrade for many years,” said Federal Member for Greenway, Michelle Rowland MP. 

“This project will provide local residents with a reliable access route, which won’t be subject to disruptive closures during periods of rain. 

“The new bridge will be welcome relief for local residents and the Rouse Hill Anglican College school community. I am looking forward to seeing this project completed and ready for use by the end of next year.” 

“The Rouse Road Bridge is an important project which will enable Rouse Road to be accessed and used all year round,” said Ward 1 Blacktown City Councillor, Chris Quilkey. 

“I am very pleased to see this project getting underway with funding from both Blacktown City Council and the Federal Government,” Councillor Quilkey said.

This project came about as a result of support from Michelle Rowland MP for Blacktown Council’s application to the Federal Government’s Bridges Renewal Program. The funding was secured by Blacktown Council and Michelle Rowland MP as part of Round 2 of the Bridges Renewal Program in 2016.